Cider Gallery

Robert McNown's Final Friday show

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Join us this Final Friday, March 30th from 5-9pm for Robert McNown's Recent Paintings show! We will have a cash bar and ample opportunity for conversation.

To make an evening of it, you'll need some insider info about our neighbors...

Everyone knows the best way to enjoy art is with a full belly. We highly recommend Bon Bon for fun food and fantastic cocktails, or Lawrence Beer Company for beer and modern (and delicious) brewery fare.

Just east of Cider are SeedCo Studios, Art Emergency, and Rural Pearl - Cut Paper Art by Angie Pickman, where you can see even more marvelous local pieces and artists.

See you tomorrow!

Sinatra party attire ideas: fella's edition

Joining us the evening of December 16th to celebrate Frank Sinatra’s birthday? Unsure about what to wear? If you want to dress up (and we strongly encourage it), you don’t have to break the bank to channel Ol’ Blue Eyes and his crew.

For a classic Sinatra-era look, all you need is a simple suit (either navy, black, or gray) with a skinny black tie or bowtie. And don't forget the classic white button-down. For accessories, we recommend a pocket square, a cocktail in your hand, and a fedora, and don't forget to "Cock your hat -- angles are attitudes."

For more information about this event and to purchase tickets, visit frank-sinatra-event.

 

October Final Friday, showcasing John Gary Brown

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Here is a sneak peek of John Gary Brown’s work for our October Final Friday show. We can’t help but gush about the way his work fits so naturally in the gallery.

Don’t miss the opportunity to see it up close and personal tomorrow from 5-9pm!

Here is the artist's statement:

My paintings, although basically non-objective, are often organized around a horizon line, and they are intended to be seen as landscapes, inspired by the prairies of my home state of Kansas, the watery vistas in the Puget Sound area, or the more ordered grounds of rural Europe. The arid regions of the Middle East and Southwest United States provide references to the decayed, full circle magic that seems to reflect the beginnings and the end of earth’s cycles, and lately I have begun to look inward, toward a landscape of dreams and meditation. Whatever the point of departure, the landscape for me is part of that unhurried, inexorable natural process that deserves respect and emulation. Structure or phenomena are sometimes implied but rarely spelled out, so that an air of mystery pervades the imagery and the painting process becomes an essential part of the subject matter. I am an admirer of J.M.W. Turner and the post impressionist artists who flirted with abstraction, but I’m also influenced by modern masters like Mark Rothko and Richard Diebenkorn.

The paintings are executed in layers. A wash of free-flowing “under painting” is applied by brush and allowed to form organic shapes, before the canvas is placed face up in the studio, so that the contours will stabilize and partially dry. When the paint is ready for another layer it will be applied by brush, print brayer or cloth. Some areas of the submerged color will be revealed by paint rag or palette knife, providing an interior luminosity that can’t be attained by painting onto the surface. Oil paint is the only medium I use for this process. Drawing is worked into the image with a brush or the edge of a print brayer and this process is repeated in several layers until the painting is completed. 

I will occasionally make veiled references to natural forces in nature, such as wind and water, or to the transitory works and activity of mankind, but I believe our marks upon the earth are superficial and fleeting. I try to depict and celebrate what is truly elemental on the planet- the endless handiwork of water, atmosphere and light. Many of the canvases are named for places and circumstances brought about by the manipulations of humanity, but the dominant feature in each one is the ongoing celestial process. 

I have been a professional artist since 1970 and my work can be found in over five hundred private, museum and corporate collections. I have shown in thirty galleries over the years, from New Jersey to Seattle, and have participated in almost one hundred exhibitions, many of them one-man shows. In Seattle my work has been featured with Dale Chihuly, Kenneth Callahan and Mark Toby. I keep a studio in Lawrence, Kansas, and Creede, Colorado, and look forward to many more years of painting.

For more information about the artist, please visit http://www.johngarybrown.com/.

Artist in Focus: Yuri Zupancic

Yuri Zupancic is an artist from Dodge City, KS who divides his time between Paris, France and Lawrence, KS. Currently, Yuri spends most of his time working in Paris and Berlin.

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 Yuri Zupancic is a mixed media artist who currently serves as the Art Director and Curator at William Burroughs Communication. He is also a co-founder of Fresh Produce Art Collective and DotDotDot Artspace in Lawrence. His accomplishments are many, including mentions in major magazines such as Wired, Juxtapoz, and the Huffington Post, and he has been internationally recognized for these achievements.

Born in 1980 in Dodge City, Kansas, Yuri was largely self-taught as an artist. His works can be described as mixed media art that combines oil painting and recycled technological components. Represented by Galerie KO21 in Paris, his works have shown in such cities as Berlin, Sydney, and major art locales of London, Paris, and New York. In association with his work in France, Yuri works with the Estate of William S. Burroughs to promote the author’s artistic and literary legacy throughout the United States and the world. This influence reaches to include exhibitions that have shown at the Pompidou Center and the Royal Academy of the Arts in London. 

Yuri is inspired by the relationship between electronics and nature. His inspiration is best summarized in his own words:

“With this proliferation comes new awareness, accountability, and free exchange of ideas. But privacy is disappearing. And with it our capacity for internal reflection. Hyper-connectivity does not encourage meditation or independent thinking. We must force our machines to work in our best interests -not theirs. Everyday life is being ‘augmented’ in a hurry. My aim is to benefit from these marvelous advances without losing control of our own evolution”

(Yuri Zupancic, October 2016).

Each of his artworks has a narrative; that of the conflict and the amalgamation of nature and technology. Yuri takes this subject to new heights by using the technology as his “canvas.” By doing so, he physically imprints technology with nature. His works features painted images that are organic in subject or form, often flora or plant matter, situated upon computer components such as: microchips, circuit boards, and sound cards. Some of these pieces feature a living element, where physical plants grow from within the artwork; it is these pieces that most closely reflect his stated ideology of “the spaces between.” These spaces represent a state that can be described as a node of connectivity that mirrors the inner mappings of the human brain.

 By combining high tech and fine art, Yuri uses the human need for reflection and independent thought to emphasize the overabundance of technology in our world. Due to the nature of his expression, he is not limited to physical expression. By using light and sound in massive projections, he is able to express the same idea without any physical object to present the work. His work is not a critique, but rather a reflection of the state of our technological culture. Wherein each piece is a hope that our, “hybrid existence [is] a future which is more of an upgrade than a downgrade.”

Spreading Seeds , oil on microchip, 3 x 1.5 cm.

Spreading Seeds, oil on microchip, 3 x 1.5 cm.

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Newlywebd, oil paint and assemblage on circuit boards.

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Silicon Mountain, electronic waste sculpture with miniature paintings in oil, silicon, metal leaf on microchips. Exhibited at AKAA 2016, Carreau du Temple, Paris.

 

All images and quotes taken from the artist's webpage: https://www.yurizupancic.com/

Artist in Focus: Susan Grace

Susan Grace is a local Lawrence artist who uses her immense knowledge of classic literature to express notions of instability, memory, and human communication and connections.

Susan Grace is a professional painter living and working in Lawrence, KS. She has a long and illustrious career exhibiting in art galleries throughout the U.S., including: the ARC Gallery in Chicago, Riverside Art Museum in California, the World Trade Center and an assortment of local galleries. In addition to her frequent showings, the artist has garnered acclaim and various awards for her paintings. Most notable of these are special recognition and honorable mention by The Artist Magazine and the Upstream People Gallery Online in Omaha, NE. She is currently showing in the Re: Solution group exhibition on display at the Cider Gallery.

 While not formally trained, her education on painting began in Athens, Greece. Before becoming a professional painter, she used her education in theater and literature to teach Literature courses to curious students. As such, her life-long study of the works of both American and European authors is considered by the artist to be a major source of inspiration for her artwork. She often describes her works in the form of poems and quotes from famous authors. As seen on her website, the artist draws her major inspiration from the works of Thomas Pynchon and Samuel Beckett, stating:

“In my paintings I explore issues related to disintegration, disorientation, instability, and attempts to communicate using some kind of written sign, including text translations and asemic writing [writing devoid of semantic context]. From shifting perceptions, unreliable memories...we construct an identity and a personal and sometimes briefly shared narrative of the past and a possible future.”

 This notion is reflected in the most recent works of Grace, displayed on the walls of the Cider Gallery. These pieces, which merge and flow with sweeping lines and a muted color palette, are often punctured by swirling script. The script reflects writing, but is not recognizable as such. Instead, the juxtaposition of pastel text over shades of brown and orange expresses the artists ideas of textual translations that are both unreliable and yet fixed, reflecting the imperfection of memory. In the instance of these images, the following passage picked by the artist best describes the tension between recollection and the blankness of unconsciousness.

 

“She could, at this stage of things, recognize signals like that, as the epileptic is said to—an odor, color, pure piercing grace note announcing his seizure. Afterward it is only this signal, really dross, this secular announcement, and never what is revealed during the attack, that he remembers. Oedipa wondered whether, at the end of this (if it were supposed to end), she too might not be left with only compiled memories of clues, announcements, intimations, but never the central truth itself, which must somehow each time be too bright for her memory to hold; which must always blaze out, destroying its own message irreversibly, leaving an overexposed blank when the ordinary world came back.”

― Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (1966)

"Blue Ciggy #2," oil on canvas.

"He's In Town Again," mixed media on canvas.

"Staring Too Long," mixed media on canvas, triptych.

Visit the artists webpage here: http://www.susangracestudio.com/ 

Artist in Focus: Jeromy Morris

Jeromy Morris is not only the curator of the Cider Gallery and the director at SeedCo Studios, he is also a mixed media artist living and working in Lawrence, KS.

Jeromy Morris was born in Denver, CO and he received his Bachelor’s degree in Visual Communications and Graphic Design from the University of Kansas. Since that time, he has co-founded the Fresh Produce Art Collective, is the Director at SeedCo Studios (a venue that merges art and music which was founded by the Fresh Produce Art Collective) and is our very own curator here at the Cider Gallery.

Morris has shown in a variety of galleries and special exhibitions, such as the show: “More Than Meets the Eye,” a collaboration with John Sebelius at the Cider Gallery in 2014. Most recently, he is participating in the current exhibition at the Cider Gallery, “Re: Solution,” with fellow Fresh Produce Art Collective artists: Jeremy Rockwell, Erok Johanssen, and Yuri Zupancic.

His artwork, which has been featured in numerous private collections, emphasizes the relationship between two or more disparate mediums. In this way, Morris finds inspiration through his exploration of multiple mediums that are continually infused with movement and emotion. This tendency toward movement is especially obvious in his video art and installation pieces. Despite this, he is most known for his two-dimensional works on panels. These two-dimensional works often emphasize mood and the recollection of memory. They are a motley of various materials. Epoxy, acrylic, toner transfers, spray paint, and found objects vie for space on found-wood pieces or panels. Morris’ works are primarily inspired by the interactions between opposing forces; consumerism and advertising are pitted against urban ruins and the forces that exist between nature and industry.

"Rome." Mixed media on panel. 

"Nocturnal Mandala." Mixed media (toner transfer, spray paint, acrylic, polar panoramic) on wood.

"Ferris Wheel." Mixed media on wood.

 

 

All images taken from the artist's webpage: jeromymorris.com

Don't forget to visit: www.freshproduceartcollective.com and  www.seedcostudios.com for more information. 

 

 

Spring 2017 Fine Arts Internship


Are you looking to gain experience with working in a gallery?

We are excited to announce that the Cider Gallery is now accepting applications for our Spring 2017 Fine Arts Internship!

Intern responsibilities include: show promotion, assisting curator with hanging and organizing monthly exhibits, gallery attendant, and hosting show openings and artist talks when possible.

Interested applicants should send their resume to the gallery director at jennifer@cidergallery.com

'Visualizing Ideas from A to Z'

Thank you to everyone who came to our Final Fridays event this past weekend!

December's show, 'Visualizing Ideas from A to Z' includes work by artist, Stephen Johnson. What we love most about this show is the diversity from piece to piece and the unique viewing experience provided by the salon-style hanging. From realistic life paintings to large abstract works it is easy to spend a lot of time in the gallery.

810 Pennsylvania.
Tuesday-Friday, 1-5pm

"Blue Island" Adam Smith

I’ve never been able to sit quietly and look at my country from outside of it, it was a really glorious experience. In a lot of ways that experience was just what I needed to gain a little perspective on my life. Sometimes it’s really hard to realize how beautiful it is until I’m given the opportunity to look at it from the outside -Adam Smith

Taken in British Columbia 

“Movement Material” Comes to the Cider Gallery on December 5th

The Lawrence Arts Center is presenting an evening of works by Jeremy Moss (film maker) and Pamela Vail (dancer). The event will take place at the Cider Gallery on Monday, December 5th at 7 pm and is FREE and open to the public. More details are given in the post below.

" Movement Material is a 60 minute program of video, 16mm projection, and live performance that highlight transfigurative gestures via the collision of camera and dance. This program explores the roles and functions of both the cinematographer (Jeremy Moss) and the dancer (Pamela Vail) while engaging questions of space, movement, and the ways in which the frame and the cut create alternate walls and rhythms."

https://lawrenceartscenter.org/2016/10/movement-material-comes-to-the-cider-gallery-on-december-5th/

 

'This Must Be The Place' Troy Moth & Adam Smith

Thank you to everyone who came by this past weekend for Final Fridays! We were extremely happy with the turnout and so excited to continue to have this show up until the end of November.

'This Must Be The Place' includes photography by Troy Moth and Adam Smith. The two artists are good friends that travel the world together while photographing the grandeur of nature along the way.

All of the photographs in the gallery can be purchased in three sizes: 16"x24", 24"x36" and "40x"60".

Cider Gallery. Tuesday-Friday. 1-5pm. 810 Pennsylvania.

The work above is 'Buffalo 01' by Troy Moth.

Artist Spotlight: Susan Grace

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Figure in White, 2007

Oil on Canvas

72” X 24”

Although the subject matter of Susan Grace’s paintings alternates between depictions of the human form and disintegration of rigid architectural structures, the theme of repeated fragmentation and influence of literature remains consistent throughout her work.

In her painting, Figure in White, the subject is easily identifiable as human, at first glance; however, the longer the viewer stares at the work the more they realize each limb is actually another object, form, or abstraction of the human body. The work, which undeniably portrays the female form, uses pictographs, script, and distorted objects to give the viewer a clue into the identity of the figure.

Make sure to stop by our gallery hours, Tuesday to Friday from 1-5 PM, during the month of October to see Fragments// Paintings by Susan Grace and Photography by Kyle Batson!